Phosphatidylserine

Summary

Eating a fillet of fish comes with a host of health benefits including omega-3 fatty acids, protein, and the amino acid derivative phosphatidylserine. Because phosphatidylserine is fat soluble and researched alongside fish oil, the two are commonly used to enhance cognitive functioning [1].

The supplement is well studied for children who are struggling with ADHD and need an Adderall alternative [2]. On the other end of the spectrum, elderly individuals can improve their cognition and prevent cognitive decline [3].

Phosphatidylserine is one of a few phospholipids, which constitute 15% of the human brain [4]. This naturally occurring compound is considered a reliable nootropic that can also reduce feelings of fatigue [5], memory [6], and in one study researchers even found a correlation of improved golfing scores [7].

Also Known As

PS

Editors’ Thoughts on Phosphatidylserine

I have only used phosphatidylserine confounded with other variables in a product called BrainJuice. It was added as part of a new recipe for their product, which did affect me in a better way than their original product. It was a good formula change.

This would be a good supplement to take with fish or krill oil simply because there is so much research regarding the pairing of the two. Also, phosphatidylserine is a naturally occurring compound that interacts with fatty acids in the brain (like the ones you would find in DHA / EPA).

For a relatively new nootropics user, phosphatidylserine might be a useful natural cognitive enhancer to dip their toes and improve their general cognitive ability rather than focusing on something specific (i.e: intense concentration or memory).

Mansal Denton, Nootropedia Editor

phosphatidylserine

Benefits of Phosphatidylserine

A host of nootropics or smart drugs are merely supplements that impact both the brain and the body (often with the brain as a secondary side effect). With phosphatidylserine, the research and benefits are primarily focused on the brain. The compound is found naturally occurring in the brain and studied for synergistic effects.

For elderly, one of the main benefits of phosphatidylserine is preventing cognitive decline. One Japanese study of elderly individuals showed that taking phosphatidylserine for 6 months could stave off cognitive decline and signs of dementia [8]. Another study of Alzheimer’s patients suggested 3 weeks of supplementation could reduce symptoms of cognitive decline [9].

While some evidence confounds these results [10], the common trend suggests that middle-age and elderly people can prevent many symptoms of cognitive decline with phosphatidylserine.

The phosphatidylserine benefits for concentration and focus primarily surround children already diagnosed with ADHD. Only 2 months of the supplement helped reduce symptoms of ADHD and secondary issues, such as impulsivity and poor short-term memory [11]. Another study combined phosphatidylserine and fish oil to improve attention [12]. Considering many children in the western world are taking amphetamine-based Adderall at a young age, this is a useful alternative.

It’s great to focus better while working on your projects, but having a better capability to learn and apply yourself creatively can make a bigger difference. Evidence suggests this supplement can improve memory in general [13], but also helps specifically with working memory and the processing speed and accuracy of information [14].

All of this translates to better cognitive abilities in general and there are plenty of fun downstream effects. For example, one study showed a significant improvement in golf accuracy and performance after taking phosphatidylserine! [15]

Phosphatidylserine Side Effects

There are almost always side effects with any compound that you want to support your brain. Phosphatidylserine is a naturally occurring compound, which means you are safer to consume this than many synthetic drugs. One study showing twice the recommended dosage mentioned “no adverse effects” on elderly patients over 12 weeks [16].

No other research on the topic of toxicity and phosphatidylserine exists so it is important to start with the recommended dosage and then increase slowly as your body accepts the supplement.

Phosphatidylserine Dosage

The starting dosage of phosphatidylserine is 100 mg taken 3 times a day for a total of 300 mg. Almost all of the studies on elderly individuals suggest this is the best dosage to take. However, children who are using the supplement for ADHD and attention enhancement may use doses of 200 – 400 mg.

If one finds that the drug is well-tolerated, taking 600 mg over the course of a day (double the recommended dose) is not unheard of, though studies only exist at this dose range for elderly people with cognitive decline.

How and Where to Buy Phosphatidylserine

Phosphatidylserine capsules are not hard to come by as it is a popular compound for improving brain health. There are probably products at your local health food store, but it may be better to search online.

Some products are filled with soy, which is not always healthy. Thus one good recommendation if you buy phosphatidylcholine is Now Foods. It is a reliable brand and their soy free product comes with a month’s supply for less than a dollar a day. Many of the other products have many ingredients or proprietary patents, which aren’t really necessary.

We recommend using the phosphatidylserine with your favorite fish oil product because it has a synergistic effect together.

Selected Community Experiences

“…every time i take Semax i get pretty irritated, like i get angry because of nothing. Combining it with Phosphatidylserine will take that irritability away to a good extend.” [17] – cobue

“I eat a can of herring every morning. It’s a good source of PS and Omega-3’s.” [18] – bummercitywipeout

References (Click to Expand)
  1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21807480
  2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23495677
  3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11842880
  4. http://www.jbc.org/content/146/1/35.full.pdf
  5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16394955
  6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20523044
  7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2217563/
  8. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21103034
  9. http://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/107142
  10. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11842880
  11. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23495677
  12. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21807480
  13. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20523044
  14. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22017963
  15. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2217563/
  16. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12385596
  17. https://www.reddit.com/r/Nootropics/comments/2sm224/phosphatidylserine_will_take_irritability_from/
  18. https://www.reddit.com/r/Nootropics/comments/3cjms1/experience_with_natural_phosphatidylserine_sources/
Other Scientific Resources (Click to Expand)
  1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22575036
  2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21103402
  3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23312676
  4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6157799
  5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2170852
  6. http://www.jissn.com/content/4/1/5
  7. http://www.jbc.org/content/146/1/35.full.pdf
  8. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18846580
  9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1675487
  10. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6310426
  11. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6397694
  12. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23115087
  13. http://bloodjournal.hematologylibrary.org/content/92/7/2590.full
  14. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8241513
  15. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7595231
  16. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6331412
  17. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7251589
  18. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4347683
  19. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8708821
  20. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11694624
  21. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1325348
  22. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22017963
  23. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23495677
  24. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21807480
  25. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18469236
  26. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21854650
  27. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20848234
  28. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18616866
  29. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2217563/
  30. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2132640

Author

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