Green Tea Extract

Green Tea Extract

Summary

As your green tea is steeping, you sit at your computer, scroll through some interesting articles, and take a moment to relax. You’re preparing for a challenging day at work or perhaps recovering from one. The green tea is ready, you sip, and enjoy the calmness from a warm cup. What you may not realize is all the psychoactive compounds that make this experience possible.

Green tea extract (also known as green tea catechins) are four molecules that can benefit almost every organ system in the body from the heart to the brain. Taking a green tea extract supplement comes with many antioxidant benefits as well [1].

Generally, green tea extract is a useful supplement though not for any particular benefit. Also, given you need a high dosage of the catechins, trying to get all the benefits of the extract by drinking tea probably will not be easy. Luckily, the supplement form is well tolerated in humans and there are few concerns with toxicity [2].

Also Known As

Camellia sinensis, Green Tea Extract, GTE

Editors’ Thoughts on Green Tea Extract

I’m a big believer in antioxidants and the benefits of green tea, but I suspect the only way to get enough of this extract is to take the supplemental form. I’ve never tried capsules of green tea catechins (or EGCG as the most famous), but it seems to have general health properties.

Mansal Denton, Nootropedia Editor

green tea extract

Benefits of Green Tea Extract

Technology is growing at a rapid pace and helping humans to increase lifespans much quicker than ever before. Now that aging and longevity have become a major topic of importance, nootropic drugs that can improve these markers are more popular. One interesting benefit of green tea extract is an increase in lifespan evidenced by a 6% boost in animal studies [3].

For the brain, there are a host of cognitive benefits. The main component of green tea extract, EGCG, is able to easily cross the blood-brain barrier [4] and increase brain activity. One of the 8 week trials on rats suggested it could improve memory formation and spatial memory [5].

Additionally, green tea catechins benefits are associated with anxiety and stress reduction itself. While evidence is scarce, this may be due to EGCG’s ability to negate the negative modulation of GABA (A) receptors [6].

The cognitive benefits of green tea extract are helpful, though not profound. However, supplementation can help with a number of other biomarkers. For instance, blood flow is increased by 40% with green tea consumption [7]. A number of studies suggest green tea extract can help burn fat and is a powerful antioxidant [8].

For someone who is considering an “all-included” nootropic and general health supplement, EGCG or green tea extract may be good options.

Side Effects of Green Tea Extract

There are relatively few side effects of green tea extract. As with most extracts and herbal products, one of the main issues is gastrointestinal distress. Some people complain about this when taking too high of a dosage or just taking extracts that are unnatural for the body to absorb.

With regard to EGCG specifically, there are toxicity studies that show intestine, stomach, and liver damage may result from extreme “mega” doses [9]. These studies typically use doses of 500 – 2000 mg per kg of body weight, which is far above the recommended dosage for humans.

Green Tea Extract Dosage

Usage of green tea extract is going to depend on your goals and desires. For people who want to use green tea extract for standard health, an average cup of tea will have around 50 mg of EGCG (the most active compound).

Doses for fat burning are far higher around 200 – 250 mg of pure EGCG (though most supplements are 50% EGCG). For preventing cancer, the green tea extract dosage is around 200 mg or higher 3 times per day.

How and Where to Buy Green Tea Extract

Green tea extract is easily available at your local health food store and grocery store. Most locations where supplements are sold will have green tea extract for sale. However, buying from a trusted and reputable vendor is always safer in the long-run. It is also often more affordable to buy green tea extract online as well.

At Nootropedia, we have vetted certain nootropics vendors thoroughly and Nootropics Depot has a good reputation. They currently sell a green tea extract with 50% EGCG and even have a full certificate of analysis on their product page (for extra safety and precaution).

Selected Community Experiences

I have been very enthousiastic about green tea for a long time, it’s chilling me out, as well as motivating me.” [10] – multiple_sclerotia

I just started taking 5-htp for my anxiety and I’ve read that is important to take it with green tea extract that contains ECGC.” [11] – pacilandra

References (Click to Expand)
  1. //www.mdpi.com/2076-3921/4/2/373
  2. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12960117
  3. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15247057
  4. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9806157
  5. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18078701
  6. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16859659
  7. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21394199
  8. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12064344
  9. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9311619
  10. //www.reddit.com/r/Nootropics/comments/18kvje/best_way_to_make_a_green_tea_extract/
  11. //www.reddit.com/r/Nootropics/comments/2il7jo/5htp_and_green_tea_extract/
Other Scientific Resources (Click to Expand)
  1. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20490689
  2. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11385060
  3. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15284381
  4. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9311619
  5. //jn.nutrition.org/content/133/12/4172.short
  6. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14640574
  7. //www.mdpi.com/2076-3921/4/2/373
  8. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15958649
  9. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14652367
  10. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10864017
  11. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11558573
  12. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12960117
  13. //cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/11/10/1025.abstract
  14. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15580809
  15. //clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/11/12/4627.abstract
  16. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20080030
  17. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18433082
  18. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9568793
  19. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16081270
  20. //cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/10/1/53.abstract
  21. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14511674
  22. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17362033
  23. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21445620
  24. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19597519
  25. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22371762
  26. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12695345
  27. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8039535
  28. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1407012
  29. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10192923
  30. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10676994

Author

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