Ashwagandha

Ashwagandha

Summary

Imagine being in rural India 3000 years ago, feeling anxiety, and prescription drugs a completely unknown concept. For many ancient Indians in this situation, the answer was Ayurvedic medicine and ashwagandha in particular. This herbal anxiety reducer has seen continued usage in India until the present and modern science is vindicating our ancestors’ claims.

Traditional Ayurvedic medicine noted many benefits of ashwagandha and modern science has shown anxiety-reduction [1], improved neuroprotection [2], and even anti-cancer protection as well [3]. There is some evidence that it can also help to improve focus and concentration, but the primary use of ashwagandha is for anxiety-reducing properties.

Typically the root extract is the psychoactive part of the plant, which confers mental health benefits. Ashwagandha is an adaptogen and is one of the most popular herbs still used in Indian medicine today.

Also Known As

Withania Somnifera, Indian Ginseng, Smell of Horse, Winter Cherry, Dunal, Solanaceae

Editors’ Thoughts on Ashwagandha

I’ve never tried ashwagandha as I’ve always turned to lemon balm for anxiety reduction. If I was just starting out with nootropics and wanted to reduce anxiety and improve other aspects of cognition, ashwagandha would be my suggestion (along with bacopa monnieri).

Mansal Denton, Nootropedia Editor

Ashwagan

History of Ashwagandha

In traditional Indian cultures, ailments and diseases fell under different categories as did the medicinal plants and herbs that treated them. In early recordings the herb was classified as a general tonic to aid in health (i.e: an adaptogen) [4], but also a strength promoter and aphrodisiac [5].

Given the many classifications and uses of ashwagandha, it was dubbed the “king of Ayurveda” in some colloquial sources [6].

Benefits of Ashwagandha

The primary benefit of ashwagandha is as a stress and anxiety reducing compound. In a anxiety disorder study, patients were given ashwagandha for 8 weeks and noticed 56.5% reduction in their anxiety compared to only 30.5% by the placebo [7] (a difference of 26%).

While this study was based on subjective tests of their anxiety levels (hence the placebo increases), another study analyzed cortisol levels (an indicator of stress) and found a 27.9% reduction [8]. Thus both types of studies found between a 25 – 30% anxiety reduction in their respective measurements. Imagine what you could do feeling ⅓ less stress in your life.

Another benefit, owing to the adaptogenic properties, is anti-fatigue. High dose ashwagandha was tested in chemotherapy patients over 6 cycles and proved more effective in increasing general function and reducing fatigue [9].

Finally, there are subjective wellbeing benefits of using ashwagandha as well. This is a downstream effect of reducing anxiety, but one 60 day study including 98 patients recorded increases in their overall mood and feelings of well being [10] (synonymous with happiness).

How Does Ashwagandha Work?

In scientific conversation the question “how does ashwagandha work?” is called the “mechanism of action”. With this herb, the mechanism of action is still unknown after 3000 years, but scientists have a pretty solid theory. The nootropic seems to have GABA-mimicking behavior, which is considered the main mechanism for how ashwagandha works as an anxiety reducer [11].

Also, one of the main compounds found in ashwagandha is called “withaferin A”, which is a strong anti-inflammatory agent [12].

Side Effects of Ashwagandha

Despite ashwagandha being a natural herb used for thousands of years, the active ingredient can still cause some side effects. One of the studies showed that rats taking extremely high doses of ashwagandha increased their food intake as well [13].

Some of the higher doses (such as 5 grams compared to the 300 mg dosage recommendation) can also create topical ashwagandha side effects. A case study showed a burning / itching sensation on a male’s penis as a result of 10 days of elevated supplementation [14]. This is obviously rare and specifically when taking over 15 times the recommended dosage.

As with many herbs, there are anecdotal reports that people experience nausea and gastrointestinal distress as a result of using ashwagandha as well. While it can be rare, it is still something to keep in mind.

Ashwagandha Dosage

Ashwagandha has been used in many forms over the centuries, but the root extract is now the standard. The ashwagandha root extract is optimal and the acute dosage is in the 3-500 mg range. However, there are people who use an optimal dose of 6,000 mg per day divided into 3 (2,000 mg) doses.

Like many nootropics, the ashwagandha dosage will depend on your goals. For the purpose of improving stress and reducing anxiety, doses as low as 50 – 100mg.

How and Where to Buy Ashwagandha

Given the popularity of ashwagandha, it is popular and can be found in many grocery and health food stores. Due to the common nature of heavy metals in Ayurvedic products, it is important to have a trustworthy source of the compound. If you buy ashwagandha from GNC or a local store, there is no telling what could be in that product. It is better if you spend the time researching different ashwagandha for sale online to get a safer product.

There are established, tested, and effective extracts that can help you to avoid this problem. For example, Pure Nootropics ashwagandha uses KSM-66, which is a trademarked and heavily regulated extract for ashwagandha. This is the recommended product if you want to buy ashwagandha powder or if you are interested in ashwagandha capsules.

Obviously, it is much safer and a better long-term health decision to avoid heavy metals like lead, arsenic, and mercury. All of these have disastrous effects on the human body and despite regulations, there is evidence that up to 20% of the Ayurvedic herbs on the market are filled with higher than desired levels of heavy metals.

Selected Community Experiences

This stuff god rid of my brain fog, got rid of my stress, and got rid of some of my anxiety. When I take it with stimulants, it feels like my mind is smooth and clear. I’ve been testing this stuff out at my workplace.” [15] – DeitruS

This would be my 4th day, and I can tell that from the first day, after 1 or 2 hours it had a positive effect on anxiety. I observed that my head has less disturbance, that I’m less prone to anger, and thinking requires less effort.” [16] – Coz7

References (Click to Expand)
  1. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21407960
  2. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11137343
  3. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16827807
  4. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17959291
  5. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23737641
  6. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20975835
  7. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19718255
  8. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23439798
  9. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23142798
  10. //www.enaonline.org/files/artikel/205/JANA%20Vol.11_May%2031%202008.pdf
  11. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1660034
  12. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17150968
  13. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10225062
  14. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22324179
  15. //www.reddit.com/r/Nootropics/comments/2cj69a/ashwagandha_wow/
  16. //www.reddit.com/r/Nootropics/comments/2cwjkn/ashwagandha_for_anxiety_experience/
Other Scientific Resources (Click to Expand)
  1. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20975835
  2. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18191020
  3. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10720789
  4. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17959291
  5. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23737641
  6. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23439798
  7. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18348714
  8. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18398493
  9. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15253680
  10. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20483437
  11. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21728148
  12. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12045329
  13. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21044792
  14. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22125584
  15. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18988152
  16. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9332168
  17. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10956379
  18. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12628397
  19. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17190461
  20. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19152372
  21. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16293277
  22. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21854608
  23. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22263592
  24. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031942207006425
  25. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23597834
  26. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21182915
  27. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17009292
  28. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16513428
  29. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21344104
  30. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19564954
  31. //www.ias.ac.in/currsci/feb102004/461.pdf

Author

Nootropedia provides research-driven and accessible nootropics information. Don’t be in the dark about nootropics.